Battlestar Galactica Pantoum: This Has All Happened Before

This has all happened before, and it will happen again. Fans of the 2004-2009 Battlestar Galactica reboot know this mantra well. What if I told you that there's a poetic form that fits this theme of inescapable repetition perfectly? Let's explore one of my favorite monstrous manifestation (it's a poetry blog post, I had to slip in some consonance) of poetic form: the pantoum.

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[OWLS June Blog Tour: Pride] Envisioning Worlds Without Hate

Pop culture acts a platform for self-expression and provides a space for the LGBTQ+ community to find visibility. There are a number of pop culture works that include and revolve around LGBTQ+ characters. A number of these works focus on overcoming hate and discrimination, raising awareness for what individuals in the community experience in the … Continue reading [OWLS June Blog Tour: Pride] Envisioning Worlds Without Hate

Responding to Blogger Appreciation and Sunshine Blogger Awards

Back in March, two wonderful bloggers, Matthew of Matt-in-the-Hat and Zboudrie of Let's Talk Anime, nominated me for the Blogger Appreciation and Sunshine Blogger awards. Today, I wanted to share my over-due responses to these two fun awards...

[OWLS May Blog Tour: Movement] Lost Groups and Shifting Allegiances in Gargantia

This month, we're talking about "movement" in pop culture. Throughout this month, we are talking about the movements, organizations, and systems that individuals join that align with their personal values and beliefs. Often, individuals join these groups because they believe that they are doing good and are making positive changes in society. Often, these groups help to shape individual identities, with individuals either aligning with the values of the group, or rejecting them and rebelling against them. Join me in exploring this theme in the anime Gargantia on the Verdurous Planet.

Dramatic Irony: What They Don’t Know, But You Do

Recently, we took a look at verbal and situational irony in Futurama. Today, Futurama returns for another foray into a third type of irony: dramatic irony. Now that you're used to thinking of irony as the opposite of reality (kind of), stick a pin in that. Dramatic irony throws this rule out the window. Dramatic irony  creates the kinds of moments that cause you to start yelling at the characters on the screen to stop what they're doing right away...

Verbal and Situational Irony: Putting the Funny in Futurama

Comedy shows offer many great examples of irony because the comedy genre often takes advantage of irony in order to produce hilarious or unexpected outcomes. Futurama is especially good at using irony, and even talks about irony in the episode "The Devil's Hands are Idle Playthings"...

Keyboard Thoughts 1: Characters Beyond Worlds (Community Question)

Every month, I'll be asking two prompt question that are open for others to answer (you don't have to be a blogger, and you don't have to be a regular Pop Culture Literary visitor to participate). One question will be a fiction question to spark the imagination of those who enjoy writing creative pieces. The other will be a non-fiction piece designed to ignite conversation. You only need to answer one, but feel free to respond to both if they resonate with you...

Variations on Tropes and Themes: Competition in Anime [OWLS February Blog Tour: Competition]

I have an embarrassing problem: I can’t help but love tropes. Yes, I even enjoy many of the tired ones like high schoolers putting on a gender-swapped play or two or more characters swapping minds. It’s just such a delight to see the unique twists and theme combinations that authors and creators throw into less-than-unique content and see my favorite story types retold over and over again. Let’s explore the differences that theme combinations can make in repetitive story elements by looking at tropes centered around the theme of competition...